Joram Cay Bohëmɘ Am

JORAM jong tegen vaas geleund gesnJoram C. Bohëmɘ Am, singerJoram par Dieme Spijkermanfontijntje eff 1 gesnISTANBUL 07 REPETITIE 74 %dompleintje sepia zonder zwarte randen

Songs  Sky  *  Yellow  * Ask  *  Ton Coeur  * Angel  * Come along with us

Joram. Photography: Panda de l'IsleEXIF JPEGmet gloomy bar 5Joram affiche coupéspy einde 1

Quote:

Families were torn apart
People have left their country:
Country of Chariots of Bronze

They’ve made it through several areas:
Country of Duchess of the Hawk
Country of  36 Menhir
Country made of  Ruby
Even behind the Forest of the Lost Key…

(Joram C. Bohëmɘ Am, January 14th 2019)

This quote is from Joram’s video production to be finished this year:
Wonxantuaame. To see anouncement, click here


Joram as a childPoster Am   Retouche  4  GESNE

happy song…  anticipating the day of the unknown..

INTERVIEW (HELD BY GARY MILLER, STUDENT IN ART & LITERATURE)

Gary:
As far as last week’s concert….  I couldn’t deny I was really moved by both your lyrics and the togetherness of the 3 of you in music. This particularly goes with your war song. How did you experience it yourself?

Joram:
Well, to me it’s been surprising and new. Some words or ideas already existed in my head, but they came out differently somehow. Right when the piano started a tune, I felt I wanted to tell a story about a woman, tortured by her desire for a soldier who’s in a battle far away. First I couldn’t make a phrase to start with, so I just sang loose words to her and then I suddenly felt her dark sadness

Gary:
I think most of your songs showed strength like “Danger miles” and “coragem”, in Portuguese, I’m not sure how to pronounce that, did I say it right?

Joram:
(laughing) Yes, not too bad

Gary:
Both your CD track and the percussion played by one of your guests, have something catchy, a certain happy vibe at least to me… What do you want to tell us in these songs?

Joram:
Danger miles is a happy song… it’s about the adventure of travelling, not only in a desert, but also in general…  the excitement of new landscapes, the cold nights where you’re anticipating the next morning, the day of the unknown.  The “I” feels macho, warms his girl by making a fire. This should become an experience she’ll never forget.

emphasize that both are corageous  people…

Gary:
and “coragem”, what does it say and why did you write it in Portuguese?

Joram:
A woman is about to migrate and start a new life far away. Her lover doesn’t want to grudge her this opportunity… he can’t deny her this move towards success. But still he needs to show her his desolation. I wrote the chorus to emphasize that both are courageous people. Why in Portuguese? I liked the word coragem, and I like the language, that’s all.

Gary:
So in spite of their sadness, persons in your lyrics stand up and get themselves together again, is that the issue?

Joram
Well, sometimes, yes. But a song doesn’t necessarily have a happy ending, not even a solution. We can also focus on one tiny moment and sing words to it, and it might be a moment of despair just as likely as a moment of fun or admiration.

Gary:
Do you think a good song is definitely about a psychological issue?

Joram:
oh, no. A song could depict so many things… form how an engine works to what your first love wrote you on a piece of cloth, or whatever. The main character in my lyrics might as well be a chestnut on a lane..

Gary:
But a chestnut as a metaphor, you mean…

Joram:
No, not in this case. (laughing) well, if you want to look at it that way, of course you can.

joram par elske rollema SMAJoram  975

Gary:
Who are the musicians that have inspired you most?

Joram:
I admire Jeff Buckley, Björk, Portishead, Kate Bush, Evanescence. But I also love Symphonic rock bands like Within Temptation. I love David Bowie and  listen to Great jazz artists like Al Jarreau, Ray Charles, Bobby Mc Ferrin, Jobim, but also new generation singers like Jane Monheit, Alicia Keys. One of my fav bands in general is Radiohead, of course.

Gary:
Sounds good. Anything more?

Joram:
As far as producing in rock is concerned,  I estimate Prince one of the best, by the way he plays his instruments. Besides I’m fascinated by French chansons and by Oriental and African music, I grew up with Myriam Makeba. I have a crush on the Edwin Hawkin Singers… they can give wings to a moody morning if I have one.  Last but not least, I feel quite familiar with Celtic Folk and Portuguese fado

Gary:
Can you mention one artist you’ve seen Live, that touched you?

Joram:
Stanley Clarke… I’ll nver forget him. I saw him doing astonishing solo parts, he shot me right into the heart!

Gary:
You admire many musicians and you’ve just named several influences. But still you have a sound much of your own…

Joram:
I never imitate anybody, the names I mentioned, amongst may more, are musicians I love or like, but not imitate.

natalija valentic 1
Joram by Natalija Valentic

agonies felt by a woman, left behind by a lover who now sacrifices himself..

Gary:
But I’d like to go back to your war song of last week, the one that stroke me most of all, you know. You told me that night that you’d hardly ever sung about war. Why?

Joram:
I think it’s hard to do it in an integer way. I realize so well that I’ve never experienced war myself and this makes me shy away from the idea of putting war into my songs.

Gary:
But many musicians who have never been in a war, have sung about it. How do you value their songs?

Joram:
I appreciate songs about war and militarism, like Billie Joel’s “Good night Saigon”, but also more ancient sounding songs like “walsing Mathilda”, expressing soldiers’ solitude or the rock song titled “19” about Vietnam or Marlène Dietrich’s “Sag mir wo die Blumen sind”.

Gary:
This fascinates you? I mean the theme of soldiers going to war?

Joram
Well, I’m even more fascinated by what happens to women, about how they’re affected by war.

Gary:
Should new songs rather be on the female side of the war theme instead of telling us about men?

Joram:
Both are important…

Gary:
What do you mean by that?

Joram:
To such sanguineous thing as war, there should be plenty of songs to reflect on its agonies. Not the least, the agonies felt by a woman left behind by a lover who now sacrifices himself in martial combat. In my mind I see grey photographs of her, of him, and the lyrics of a song might be in red…  Red to say: heart, danger, anger, blood…   red to say: fear, but also compassion. Also for her, I mean. Her voice has got to be heard. Red words crawl over the core of every image I see

Gary: Yeah, I’m beginning to feel the point you want to make, I guess.
The suffering of war is also about women.

Joram:

War wouldn’t even be possible without women. They’re filling the vacancies at the jobs that many mobilized men had before the war began, not to mention taking care of the kids of all those fighting men. Besides, a female soldier is quite as normal as a male in some countries.

Joram  Arton 3 smaPettekoppie

Singing to self made picture: Moshe has gone to war. To be continued?

Gary:
Your improvised song last week was powerful, bringing out all these red lyrics as you call them, besides other colours, at least that’s what I feel. Will a song be just that powerful once you write all lyrics on forehand, sitting at your table?

Joram:
I don’t know, technically speaking one might expect it to be more precise, more effective, once constructed. But improvising may be about something different, its effectiveness might not be in balanced phrases, but in some intense moments. If I write a song based on last week’s impro, it probably turns out to be a different song.

Gary: You mean different than it was that night?

Joram:
Exactly, yes

Gary:
You sang that Moshe, a soldier, gave his silver watch to Sandra, his girl friend before he went to Lebanon to fight. Why is it a watch? Is that also improvised?

Joram:
A few months ago I drew an image of a girl I called Sandra and I wrote down the line: “Moshe has gone to war. To be continued?” Then, on the table before her, I drew a watch, I’m not fully aware of why…  maybe as an icon of patience, ‘cause that’s what she’ll need anyway. Doing the impro last week I recalled her face, her posture, bent over the table, the watch, the phrase about Moshe, the silence…  everything!

Gary:
Do you have plans to put together a band after having had changeing intercourse for a couple of years?

Joram:
Yes, but supposedly not this year. (after a silence): Or I might coincidentally walk into a group that already exists without me. I’m always in for a surprise.

Joram 1 Arty GESN EN GROTER KOM UIT FONTIJNTJESERIE SUB HEET DAPHNEJoram C. Bohëmɘ Am  by Kevin Scholtze

On stage in various countries

Gary:
The idea of your program ”Horizon” originally was to do “songs about traveling”. Do you like travelling yourself?

Joram:
Yes, I love it!

Gary:
In what countries did you sing on stage?

Joram:
on stage…  In England, Spain, Turkey, Italy, Belgium, Denmark. As a street artist I’ve also sung in France, Germany and Portugal and again: Turkey. Once I did some studio recording in Nicaragua

Gary:
Have you ever been to the US?
Joram:

Yes, I’ve been to Boston, Massachussets and to Connecticut and New York, together with my girl friend. We walked  many miles from Brooklin, over the bridge to Manhattan. There we saw a fantastic Blues live concert at Abraham Lincoln Centre, with black and white musicians. It was titled:
“Ain’t nothin’ but the Blues”

One of your phrases I still remember, is “You’ve lost your home land”. It sounded a little unusual in a way. Was that a song about somebody you really know?

Joram:
Yes, a refugee I knew. I felt what her country meant to her and imagined how extreme the dangers must have been, that urged her to leave. She’d lost most of her kin, which fact gives the words “lost your home land” a different meaning. It’s more than just the geographic sense of her country located by coordinates X and Y, a place with its daily life, its familiar colours, its possibilities, its fragrances, its stories… I began to realize that my song had to be not only about just loosing the country itself, but about loosing your own people as well.

Gary:
Is it also about fear?

Joram:
In a certain way, yes. The woman for whom I wrote the song, had a hard time.

Migrating asks for some persistence at least and if it’s from an African desert village to a country like Holland, I’m not amazed if  you call it the heavy stuff…  More over, she had to live this experience all alone.

                                          Joram Cay Bohëmɘ Am, made by
Joey Broekx, 2013

doing lyrics about a lady kicking off her shoes… watching her mirror, her only consolation…

Gary:
Does your own love life inspire you to write new songs?

Joram:
Sure, I can write them to express my love for a woman, but also to process my dissapointments. Being human, we can change so swiftly that understanding each other may become harder. Love has been a  struggle to me sometimes. So I sing to give that heart ache a new direction.

Gary
Is that heart ache the main theme in your songs?

Joram:
No, a thing that intrigues me more, for instance, is people’s loneliness in general, I mean love being overruled by the hectic, the egoism and the uncertainty in our society. That’s why I sing about the lady in the bath room,  kicking off her shoes…  watching her mirror as her only consolation, cursing at her sofa because it’s old and out of fashion, having an inner struggle about where to go out tonight, which isn’t such a big deal ‘cause all hot spots in town are equally unlikely to yield her that long expected friend that really will listen.

Gary:
Some of your songs I heard, are quite elaborated as far as the instrumental parts are concerned. Besides you do your own backing vocals, extended with a female singer. But on stage last week it was a different story. I mean: you guys had no means but two instruments and one voice. And not to mention, no preparation at all. How could this become so beautiful?

Joram:
Well, these 2 musicians are very good. The pianist has many colours and nuances. The bass has a tremendous timing. To me as a singer, bass is very important as a guide, while I’m pointing my new-to-be-born melody as a function of time. It’s not always easy to find out which instant of time is apt for an emphasis, and which moments are good for silence. To estimate where a phrase is free to have a subtle slow down… In my experience it often goes with the bass, definitely when we go rubato. And I was lucky this time, the man with that huge instrument in his hands was really good!

just a silly word like “shoe string” might become music in the end..

Gary:
Does it ever occur to you that you step up a stage to jam, without a slightest idea of what will come up to you?

Joram:
Of course.

Gary:
Does it make you feel embarrassed?

Joram:
Before we start, yes. Sometimes. Mostly, I comfort myself in my head and then just enter the stage. At a certain point something will come up, though it may be just a silly word like “shoe string”, never mind. It’s a word that can become music in the end!

This interview I did with Joram today, February 15th. 2010. The live performance I’ve seen last thursday, was in Delft, Netherlands. I’ve written down as exactly as possible the words we exchanged.

Gary M,  Art Student

The pictures you see here, were added to the interview by me,

Patricia


Quote:

Let me unfold the Sunday Times and time will unfold
on this grey table and I’ll try to read in cold moonlight

Moonlight spreads out over the paleness of your fingers
that crawl over my hand…

(from:  Joram’s song “‘Angel”,  album: “Ask, where is Embla?)

Joram, Sander, Rogier
(left): Lakeheaven band. Photo by Hans Simonis                                                                                                  

 

2 comments on “Joram Cay Bohëmɘ Am

  1. Janique van Esch says:

    fabulous interview with a magnificent artist

  2. Janique van Esch says:

    Fascinating singer. Interesting post to read.

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